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Around Honmachi, financial district, Osaka.

I was walking for 5 hours to see art show that are held inside the old buildings in downtown Osaka, Honmachi, Financial district. It was raining, so it was hard to take photos. I will post more photos later, but here are some photos that to show examples of old buildings (around 1920th) and to the present and their materials. For the street shoot, I don't have all the research of years of their made at this point.

Click on title to see more.



Concrete with metal escape added later. 1920 structure. I am not sure, but I think it is the back of a bank building.





I think this is a hotel. The bottom gabled area is a convenience store that was added later. It is framed with compound plastic. On the left hole is an entrance of the subway. It looks like a tiles but just attached fake on top of the concrete.



One on the corner looks old. Using real bricks and concrete on top floors. Other buildings around are newer. You can even notice with the color of the wall. The type of the windows is also Western that is unusual for Japanese office buildings now. Like I experienced with some San Francisco housings, it is sliding up to open.



This is a Japanese house and warehouse. It is a combination of concreate, wood, and coal. Clay roof tiles are on top. It looks like there is a garden inside of the wall.



I just can tell concrete and stucco, but it is just old spooky buildings with nice designed windows. Assuming that is also from 1920th.







Fushimi Building
This was built in 1923 as a small hotel, and now it is used as a tenant (commercial/office) building. National treasure.
Concrete and stucco wall and metal windows and ornaments. Heavy structure, but I kind of like the simplicity of it.



Osaka Medicine Club Building. Concrete with an aluminum sash [window frame].



Happy Bar, Achako. Very happy looking indeed... Notice the difference of size of the windows, and how the building is framed with other tall buildings around. I can tell it is older than other. Because it has longer windows, which might be it has tall ceiling rooms interior, kind of like the style we learned for the Bay Area houses.



It has the same as Nakanoshima Hall style. They are real bricks. Actually, I like the apple tower behind. Metal building. I thought that it was Apple computer building, but actually, it is a high class condominium. They have a front desk like a hotel.



An old bank building. Bricks and concrete. Greek and Arabic like design. I can see the corridor around inside the wall.



Chez Wada. French restaurant. It was just closed in this February. Built in 1912.





Osaka Church. 1930. William Merrell Vories design. Stained glass. Curved window.









Shibakawa Building. Stone, brick, concrete, Western tiles. Mayan designs. Built in 1927. Year after Great Kanto (Tokyo) Earthquake, so it made it strong. Matashirou Shibakawa built. The entrance hall was narrow for taking picture. It had a double entrance door. Wooden mail box.

Kitano House. In 1928 built. Three story building.



Asuka Period house from 5~6 century, Japan. All wooden and glass roof. Cider. Cypress. Replica at History museum.

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